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Trados & Déjà Vu  
Contents  

TRANSLATING TRADOS FILES IN DV

- Understanding Trados Files

- What does a segmented Trados file look like?

- About ".bif" and ".ttx" Files

- Importing Trados Files into Déjà Vu X

- Segmenting Trados Files

- Trados file is not totally imported

- Translating TagEditor Files in Déjà Vu 3

- Editing Trados files in DV

- How to change Trados codes

- Setting up a Trados Project in DVX

- Incompatibility of Word 97 and DVX

- Cleaning a Trados file

IMPORTING TRADOS MEMORIES INTO DÉJÀ VU

- About Trados Memories

- How to export a Trados memory

- Importing a Trados Memory into DV3

- Importing a Trados 7 Memory into DVX

EXPORTING A DÉJÀ VU MEMORY TO TRADOS

- Exporting a TMX Memory to Trados

- Exporting a memory to Trados WB txt format 

- Importing Multiterm Entries

DO YOU HATE TAGEDITOR?

- Transforming "ttx" files in "rtf" files

OLD TIPS FOR OLD VERSIONS

- Joining cells in a Trados Project (DVX)

 

TRANSLATING TRADOS FILES IN DV

Understanding Trados Files

Generally speaking, when a client asks for an "uncleaned" Trados file, he is asking for a file that contains the original and translated text in the same file – a bilingual file. An uncleaned file is generated using Word (".rtf" or ".doc") or TagEditor (".bif" or ".ttx"). An "uncleaned" rtf or doc file looks like this:

{0>You will have the ability to electronically send a complete claims review file (damage assessment report and digital photo images) to your insurer.<}0{>A oficina terá a capacidade de enviar eletronicamente o relatório completo de análise do sinistro (relatório de avaliação de danos e imagens/fotos digitais) à seguradora.<0} {0>This one-time procedure gives the insurer everything they need to quickly settle the claim and let you begin the repair job sooner.<}0{>Este procedimento único fornece à seguradora tudo o que ela precisa para processar o sinistro e para que a oficina comece a trabalhar o mais cedo possível.<0}{0>And insurance companies will want to do more business with you because you make their businesses even more efficient.<}0{>E as seguradoras desejarão trabalhar mais frequentemente com sua oficina, pois ela torna o trabalho da seguradora mais eficiente.<0}

Déjà Vu can import pre-segmented Trados files, so that you can translate it and get "uncleaned" Trados files. As you can see below, a pre-segmented file has the same format as an "unclean" Trados file. The only difference is that the file does not contain a second language yet.


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What does a segmented Trados file look like?

Example of a segmented Trados file:

 
{0>You will have the ability to electronically send a complete claims review file (damage assessment report and digital photo images) to your insurer.<}0{>You will have the ability to electronically send a complete claims review file (damage assessment report and digital photo images) to your insurer.<0}{0>This one-time procedure gives the insurer everything they need to quickly settle the claim and let you begin the repair job sooner.<}0{>This one-time procedure gives the insurer everything they need to quickly settle the claim and let you begin the repair job sooner.<0}{0>And insurance companies will want to do more business with you because you make their businesses even more efficient.<}0{>And insurance companies will want to do more business with you because you make their businesses even more efficient.<0}

  • Colors are set inside Trados. In this case, source text is blue; target text is green.
  • Codes ( {0>; <}0{>; and <0} ) and source text will be formatted as hidden. 
  • For Déjà Vu, the important code is <}0{>. In this code:
      • 0 means "No Match" – Target text will not be imported into Déjà Vu.
      • 1-99 means "Fuzzy Match" — Target text will be imported into Déjà Vu as fuzzy
      • 100 means "Full Match" — Target text will be imported into Déjà Vu as matches

To know how to pre-segment a file, see "Segmenting Trados Files."

In most cases, once you have a pre-segmented file (rtf, doc, bif or ttf), all you need to do is to import it into Déjà Vu using the appropriate filter. See "How to import a Trados file into Déjà Vu."

When importing a translation for editing, it is necessary to change Trados codes. To know how, see "How to change Trados codes."

 


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About ".bif" and ".ttx" Files

Older versions of TagEditor work with a bilingual file with the extension ".bif". Déjà Vu X can import bif and ttx files (even though its bif filter has some problems), but Déjà Vu 3 cannot import ttx files. To work with ttx files in DV3, see "Translating TagEditor Files (bif/ttx) in DV3."

As a curiosity, both have a structure similar to "tmx" files.

For more info about importing TTX into DVX, please visit Atril's Knowledge Base - How to Handle TTX files in Déjà Vu X.


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Importing Trados Files into Déjà Vu X

To import Trados files into Déjà Vu is not different than to import any other kind of file.

Things to remember:

- Do not add files through the wizard. Import them using the Project Explorer.

- Import Trados doc/rtf files choosing "Trados Workbench" (and not Word or RTF) in the Properties box.

- Import TTX files choosing "Trados TTX" and BIF files choosing "Trados TagEditor."


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Segmenting Trados Files

 

To translate Trados (doc/rtf/bif/ttx) files in Déjà Vu, you need "segmented" Trados files. See "What does a segmented Trados file look like?

To segment Trados files, open Trados Workbench (Demo Version is fine) using any memory, go to Tools > Translate and:

1 - Add your files; 

2 - You should see added files inside Files to Translate box.

3 - Select Segment Unknown Sentences, Don't Update Changed Translations and Don't Translate Terms

4 - I normally choose 100%, so I do no get fuzzy matches.

5 - Click Translate. 

6 - Trados will generate a pair of files for each file pre-segmented. One will have the extension ".bak" and the other will have the extension "doc," "rtf", "bif" (if your Trados is v 5.0 or older), or "ttf."

 

TIP

If you have received a pre-translated Trados file from your client, there is a possibility that the file was not fully pre-segmented. If this is the case, segment your file as explained above. Trados will segment non-segmented text, but will not modify what is already translated/segmented.

 


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Trados file is not totally imported

If your Trados file is not totally imported, this is probably because the file is not totally segmented. You should pass files through the pre-segmenting process again. Segment your Trados file again; see "Segmenting Trados Files." Be sure to select Segment Unknown Sentences, Don't Update Changed Translations and Don't Translate Terms. This second pass will segment unsegmented units and will NOT change anything that is already segmented. After the second pass, import, translate, and export files normally. See Importing Trados Files into DV files. 


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Translating Trados TagEditor files in DV3
Alessandra Muzzi

 

Translating Trados TagEditor files in DV3:

  • Pre-segment your file using Trados Workbench. It is possible to use the demo version for this. If you have ".bif" files, skip the next and last bullet.
  • Open TagEditor and save TTX files as BIF (in the TagEditor's Save as window, just name the file <filename>.bif.) — This can be done using Trados' Demo Version.

WARNING:

It is necessary to open TagEditor, open your segmented TTX file, and (File>)Save As BIF. If you just change the name (e.g., in Windows Explorer), it will not work.

To save it as BIF, you have to do it manually; it is necessary to type "bif" (replacing ttx) in the file name box.

  • Create a TMX project in DV3, specifying BIF in the Source file extensions box (Project Configuration window), then import your files.
  • Translate.
  • Export as UTF-8
  • Open BIF file in TagEditor and Save it as TTX 

There is a script that converts all TTX files inside a folder in BIF files. The script can be found in the Files section of the TW_users group. It is named SaveAsBIF.vbs.

As an alternative

It is possible to transform your TTX files as RTF, so you can import them into DV3. See "Converting TTX files in RTF files."

Importing TTX files into DVX

For more info about importing TTX into DVX, please visit Atril's Knowledge Base - How to Handle TTX files in Déjà Vu X.


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Editing Trados files in DV

WARNING:

You only want to change Trados codes if you want to import another translator's work. That is, if somebody translated the file using Trados and you need to edit it in Déjà Vu. If files were pre-translated or pre-segmented and no one has worked on them, you can skip these instructions. If the translator formatted target text differently from source, you'll have problems exporting it (e.g.: words in italic in the target language where they were not in italic in the source language).

To edit Trados files in Déjà Vu it is necessary to change Trados codes ( <}0{> ). When importing your file into Déjà Vu,  

  • 0 means "No Match" – Target text will not be imported into Déjà Vu.
  • 1-99 means "Fuzzy Match" — Target text will be imported into Déjà Vu as Magenta
  • 100 means "Full Match" — Target text will be imported into Déjà Vu as Green

    I recommend to replace 0 codes with something >0. I generally replace them with 10. See "How to change Trados code."

Once this is done, create a Trados project, import files, and work normally. Export finished edited file normally. Sometimes there are some formatting problems in the target language — check the final document carefully


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How to change Trados Codes in DOC/RTF files

To change Trados codes, you can find and replace them manually or use a Macro.

  • To change Trados codes manually:

    In Word, open Trados file.

    Find all <}0{> formatted as hidden text and replace them with <}10{> formatted as hidden text.

  • Using a Word macro:

    Install and use macro Changing_Trados_Codes.

This macro was developed based on Judy Ann Schoen's Trados100 macro. Her macro can be found at Yahoo's (change_Trados_to100.zip). 

 


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Setting up a Trados Project in DVX
Jorge Gorín

    1. First get the Trados TM to be used if the agency has one already in place and wants you to take advantage (or disadvantage:-))) of it.
    2. Then open Workbench, and open the received Trados TM. If you received a Trados TM in text format, create a new Trados TM and import the TXT TM received into that TM. If you didn't receive any Trados TM, simply create a new and obviously empty Trados TM. (And keep it somewhere for future similar projects.)
    3. With Workbench open, in Translation Options, tick **Copy Source to Target**.
    4. Click on Tools>Translation. Make absolutely sure to tick **Segment also unknown sentences**. Then click on Add, add all the files that you want to segment, and finally click on Translate. At this point all your added files will be segmented by Trados (following Trados rules for segmentation, of course).
    5. Close the Translation window and close Workbench. Open Word if you like (it's not mandatory) and see that your files are indeed segmented. See also that Workbench created a .BAK file for each of the segmented files that is simply the original file with a different extension.
    6. Now open DVX, create a project, and go all the way (do not use the Import Wizard) until you arrive to the Project Explorer window. Locate all your present files to translate and drag them to the lower right pane. Click on each the dragged files in turn, and you will see a Properties window to the right. Start clicking on Filter until you see appear Trados Workbench to the right of it. Repeat this procedure for each of the Trados files to be
      imported.
    7. Finally, import all your files. Just in case, import them one by one so if there is some trouble with a file you can easily pinpoint it. You will see that DVX will show you in the target cells all sentences (if any) already present in the Trados TM. All other target cells will be empty.
    8. Translate normally.
    9. Proofread and export.
    10. Be happy.

If you need to join/split segments in a Trados project, see my recent message to Marco about this feature.


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Incompatibility - Word 97 and DVX
Yves Maurer

The TWB filter for DVX has always been different from the one that DV3 used and unfortunately Office 97 doesn't support the new structure of the code. So you can't import/export TWB files with DVX if you only have Office 97.


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Cleaning a Trados file

There are 2 ways to clean a Trados file.

- Open Trados Workbench.

- Go to Tools > Clean Up

- Add your file, select the appropriate option (I generally select "Don't update"), and click on Clean Up.

ALTERNATIVELY

- Inside Word, go to Tools > Macro > Macros...

- In the field "Macros in," select the Trados template.

- Select the macro named "tw4winClean.Main" and "Run."

 


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IMPORTING TRADOS MEMORIES INTO DÉJÀ VU

About Trados Memories

A native Trados memory is a set of five files (extensions: tmw, mwf, mtd, mdf, iix). It is not possible to work in DV using those files. Trados can export its memory to two formats: txt and tmx. These are the formats that can be imported into Déjà Vu. If you do not have a Trados license, you should ask your client for a txt or tmx Trados exported file.


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How to export a Trados Memory

  • Open Trados
  • Go to File > Open and open the memory you want to export. In the Open Translation Memory window, select "Exclusive" (bottom of the window).
  • Select File > Export

  • Select the first field you want to export in the "Field List" and click the "Add" button.
  • Select the second field and click "Add", and so on.
    You should select at least the Source and Target fields of your memory (in the window above, English (United States) and Portuguese (Brazil).
  • Click "OK."
  • Select if you want to export as TMX or TXT, select the directory where you want to place the exported file, and click on "Save."
  • Import the memory into DV.

 


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Importing a Trados Memory into DV

To import a Trados Memory (TWB) into Déjà Vu, you should first export it from Trados as TMX or TXT (see above). You cannot do anything with Trados memories while they are in their original format (*.tmw, *.mwf, *.mtf, *.mdf, and *.iix)

Warning: Trados v.6 and older

Trados exported memory (".txt" or ".tmx") contains codes you do not want to import into Déjà Vu. To delete them:

  • Download this macro and install it in Word. This macro will clean most of the codes
  • Open your ".txt" or ".tmx" file in Word and run the macro above
  • Save the file as ".txt" or ".tmx" (and not ".doc")
  • If DV3, open Déjà Vu 3's Database Maintenance module.
  • Open your memory.

    If exported as TMX: Go to File>Import, select TMX and be sure language codes are in the form XX-XX (and not XX_XX). If necessary, type language codes inside the appropriate fields. Those fields will accept typing.

    If exported as TXT: Go to File>Import and select "Trados WB database."

  • NOTE: Trados memory is a txt file, but will NOT be imported into DV as txt, but as Trados WB Database.

  • Select file to be imported.
  • Click Import.

 


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Importing a Trados 7.0 Memory into DVX

If your Trados memory was exported from Trados 7, when importing it into DVX, choose UNICODE (UTF-8) instead of the default (Western European - Windows). In this case, it is not necessary to clean the memory.


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EXPORTING A DÉJÀ VU MEMORY TO TRADOS

Exporting a TMX Memory from DV3 to Trados
Karin Adamczyk (based on suggestion from Tim Wright)

Déjà Vu X exports tmx files without the glitch below.

1.- Open Déjà Vu's Database Maintenance Module.

      1. Open memory you want to export
      2. Go to File > Export
      3. In External Database System, choose TMX
      4. Choose or type "For Source" and "For Target" codes (E.g., EN-US, PT-BR, etc.)
      5. Select Destination, Filter, and Fields to be exported.
      6. Press Export

2.- Look for the source language (srclang) string in the header of the TMX file exported from Déjà Vu E.g.:

<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<!DOCTYPE tmx SYSTEM "tmx11.dtd">
<tmx version="1.1"> 
<header

creationtool="DejaVu2" 
creationtoolversion="2" 
datatype="PlainText" 
segtype="sentence" 
adminlang="EN-US" 
srclang="EN"  <<<<This line
o-tmf="DVMDB"

3.- Replace it with the right codes. E.g:

<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<!DOCTYPE tmx SYSTEM "tmx11.dtd">
<tmx version="1.1"> 
<header

 creationtool="DejaVu2" 
 creationtoolversion="2" 
 datatype="PlainText" 
 segtype="sentence" 
 adminlang="EN-US" 
 srclang="FR-CA"  <<<<This line
 o-tmf="DVMDB"

4.- Open Trados and import TMX memory file.


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Exporting a Memory to Trados txt format

  1. If DV3, open Déjà Vu's Database Maintenance Module.
  2. Open memory you want to export
  3. Go to File > Export
  4. Choose Trados WB Database
  5. Choose or type "For Source" and "For Target" codes (E.g., EN-US, PT-BR, etc.)
  6. Select Destination — when typing file name, type extension ".txt"
  7. Select Filter and Fields to be exported.
  8. Press Export

Importing Multiterm Entries
Karin Adamczyk's suggestion

There is an Excel<>Multiterm  "converter" (converter.zip) in Trados Users list.

Download it and export Multiterm entries to Excel Format. Then, import Excel file into Déjà Vu's Terminology Database.

 


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DO YOU HATE TAGEDITOR?

Converting "ttx" files in "rtf" files

This is a very handy aplication that allows you to open a TTX file inside Word and to save a bilingual RTF file as TTX: TTXpress.

Additionally, converting a ttx file in an RTF allows people using DV3 to translate those files, instead of going through the process of saving them as ".bif" files.

Years ago, there was this application called ITP FILTER. Probably some old users of Trados still have it. This filter allows to save many file formats (html, Ventura, FrameMaker, etc.) as Trados RTF files.

 


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OLD TIPS FOR OLD VERSIONS

Joining cells in a Trados TTX Project (DVX 7.0.238)
Jorge Gorín

Since DVX 7.0.266, it is possible to join and split cells freely in Trados TTX files.

Do thoroughly what I do and you'll be systematically successful:

    1. Do your join/split in the DVX source segment.
    2. Reproduce EXACTLY your join/split in the Trados source file. This means do all the necessary edits in it (by means of copy/cut/paste, including required segment delimiters) as to have an exact correspondence between the cells in your Trados project in DVX and the segments now present in your Trados source file. (All these operations should be made in real time. That is, immediately after you do a change in the DVX source cell, do the corresponding change in your Trados source file.)
    3. Keep translating in DVX until you arrive to the next cell where you have to perform a join/split, and again reproduce this join/split in your Trados
      source file. In case no other join/split is required, keep translating until
      you reach the end of your file in DVX.
    4. Make sure to send the whole file in DVX to the MDB (this is obviously
      crucial, so big disclaimer here if this is not performed as required).
    5. Close your Trados file in Word, and even close Word just in case.
    6. Reimport your file into your DVX project.
    7. Pretranslate.
    8. Adjust any small discrepancies, then proofread and spellcheck.
    9. Finally, export.

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